Why Canada Needs An Abortion Policy

This is some great piece of work by Joseph Ben-Ami on why Canada’s brutal abortion laws are so absurd.

Joseph Ben-Ami of the Canadian Centre for Policy Studies has just come out with a concise, lucid paper entitled Why Canada Needs An abortion Policy. None of what Mr. Ben-Ami writes will be entirely new to anyone who’s followed this issue closely in recent years. But he does a nice job of bringing together the arguments for an abortion law into a short essay of a few thousand words.

For the benefit of FullComment readers, I’ll summarize them even further:

1. At late stages of pregnancy, there is very little biological or moral difference between slaying an unborn fetus and slaying a delivered baby. Yet, the latter is rightly considered murder, while the former isn’t even illegal.

2. Every other country in the world has some sort of abortion law, unlike Canada. We tend to regard European nations as the height of social liberalism. Yet their laws are actually quite strict when it comes to gestation limits on abortion. France, for instance, permits abortion on demand only until the 10th week of pregnancy. Is this really a case where we’re right and the whole rest of the world is wrong?

3. Creating a law to regulate abortion does not hinge — as some high-school debating types presuppose — on the existence of fetal rights. Even if one supposes that a fetus has no rights whatsoever (a radical, but admittedly widespread position in post-religious Western nations), that does not mean society has no right to protect a fetus. After all, we protect all sorts of things that have no rights — including trees, wetlands, endangered insect species and heritage buildings. If we extend protection to those things in certain cases (notwithstanding the offsetting rights of affected property owners), why would we not protect an unborn child, in certain cases, notwithstanding the offsetting rights of a mother?

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